P E O P L E A R E T H I N G S | TETRAPTYCH: DIGITAL FOCUS

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P E O P L E  A R E  T H I N G S | TRIPTYCH: DIGITAL FOCUS

Taking influence from Tommasco Del Croce by experimenting with digital lights, I chose to represent modern culture, with society now have a strong focus on digital experiences, mainly on a smart phone. This is why the subject is lit by only one light, the phone light, representing her only focusing on her phone, ignoring the rest of the world around her, shown through the composition of the phone light only lighting her face.

The images are in black and white, to represent the robotic and boring context of the images, creating a monotone feel for the images. This is also portrayed through the central framing and also the style of the tetraptych, having each composition being very similar, with equal lighting of the face, as each image is only lit by the single phone light, helping towards the digital style of the image, allowing the morbid face to only be shown, blacking out the rest of the world.

Each image is an example of a social setting, from top to bottom: In bed alone, with space for a partner that may have left but she hasn’t noticed due to her focus being elsewhere. The next image is similar to the first, but on a sofa where a couple or family may be watching TV, but she is alone, distracted by her phone. The third image shows the subject at an empty dinner table, showing that everyone has left whilst she still concentrates on her phone. The final image is the subject being left in the car, ignoring the fact no one else is. The series of images may represent a typical day of a female in a relationship, visiting family.

I feel this tetraptych links in to People Are Things, as it shows a representation of people living life through digital distractions, living a robotic life, ignoring all humanisms, overall showing the subject as more of an object, than a human.

Posted: November 30th, 2015
Categories: F I N A L S
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